Rogers Cheer Like Never Before Contest Finalists

Voting kicks off today through April 1

The winning team will be announced Sunday, April 3 during broadcast of Rogers Hometown Hockey in Winnipeg!

As announced tonight on Rogers Hometown Hockey, the 22 teams competing in the Cheer Like Never Before contest have been revealed, getting one step closer to the ultimate hockey experience (full list of teams below). Voting gets underway tonight and ends at 11:59 p.m. ET on Friday, April 1, with the winner of the cross-country contest to be announced during the final Rogers Hometown Hockey broadcast of the year by Ron MacLean on Sunday, April 3 at 7:30 p.m. ET/4:30 p.m. PT on Sportsnet.

The team receiving the most votes will win the trip of a lifetime: a trip to an NHL game, VIP Game Day Experience and the chance to perform their cheer in an NHL dressing room. Fans, families and friends can vote once per day for their favourite “cheer” video at www.hometownhockey.com/cheer. As part of the contest, teams from across the country uploaded their team cheer, with the top 5 vote-getters from each location performing their cheer in front of a panel of judges during the Rogers Hometown Hockey festivities. One winning team was chosen from each town of this season’s tour to represent their community For more information on the Cheer Like Never Before contest, visit www.hometownhockey.com

Cheer Like Never Before Top 22 Teams:

Kitchener Lady Rangers Atom B – Kitchener, ON

Ice Boltz Atom B – North Bay, ON

Fredericton Kent Kanucks Atom A – Fredericton, NB

Glace Bay Pee Wee AAA Miners – Sydney, NS

Corner Brook Atom B Royals – Corner Brook, NL

Valley Wild Atom A Female Hockey – Wolfville, NS

Brantford 99ers Minor Pee Wee AAA – Brantford, ON

Capital District Cyclones Atom Girls – Summerside, PEI

Lambton Shores Novice Rep – Sarnia, ON

Oshawa Lady General Atom AA – Oshawa, ON

Neebing Novice Devils – Thunder Bay, ON

Swift Current Initiation Penguins – Swift Current, SK

Grande Prairie Pee Wee AA Boston Pizza Knights – Grande Prairie, AB

Team Envirolube – Whitehorse, YT

NWMHA H3C1 – New Westminster, BC

Abbotsford Atom A1 Hawks – Abbotsford, BC

Saanich Braves Atom C1 – Victoria, BC

SA766 Bantam Avengers – St. Albert, AB

Penticton Wolverines Minor Pee Wee – Penticton, BC

KAOS Cheer Pee Wee 1A Girls – Calgary, AB

Prince Albert Atom II Foxes – Prince Albert, SK

Fort Garry North Flyers PeeWee A1 – Winnipeg, MB

The Rogers Hometown Hockey Tour presented by Scotiabank and Dodge rolls into 24 communities across Canada this season with a weekend of free outdoor hockey festivities for all ages, culminating in an outdoor viewing party of an NHL game broadcast every Sunday on Sportsnet, with Ron MacLean hosting live on site from the Sportsnet Mobile Studio. For more tour information visit www.hometownhockey.com

Special Air Quality Statement - Kings County

Environment Canada and the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness have issued a Special air quality statement issued for Kings County at 1:00pm, Friday March 24, 2016:

An ongoing fire at a dump located southwest of Kentville will continue to burn throughout the weekend and possibly early next week. Smoke being produced by the fire will impact any surrounding communities based on the wind direction over the next several days.

A ridge of high pressure is currently building over the region giving light and variable winds, but a warm front approaching overnight will bring some mixed precipitation Friday morning before changing over to rain in the afternoon. Winds are expected to shift to the southwest Friday afternoon and then more northerly Friday night and into Saturday morning.

The public is advised to stay inside if you have breathing difficulties.

Individuals may experience symptoms such as increased coughing, throat irritation, headaches or shortness of breath. Children, seniors, and those with cardiovascular or lung disease, such as asthma, are especially at risk.People with lung diseases, such as asthma and COPD, can be particularly sensitive to air pollution. They will generally experience more serious health effects at lower levels. Pollution can aggravate their diseases, leading to increased medication use, doctor and emergency room visits, and hospital visits.

Be air aware! Check your local weather forecasts and alerts so you know when to take extra care.

For information on how to reduce your health risk and your personal contribution to pollution levels, as well as for current and forecast AQHI values, please refer to www.airhealth.ca.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada and the Town of Wolfville's Emergency Management Coordinator via Twitter @EMO_Wolfville

Source:  Environment Canada

Town of Wolfville 2016-17 Operations Plan & Budget

The Town of Wolfville's 2016-17 Operations Plan & Budget was approved at the March 22, 2016 Town Council Meeting

Click Link:   2016-17 Operations Plan & Budget

For full details of the Town of Wolfville Press Release click here

Official Statement Re: 336 Main Street

“The Town of Wolfville takes its regulatory obligations very seriously.  The Town, its Building Official, Planning Department and Lawyers have been working in cooperation with the owner of 336 Main Street to create a plan for work to be done on the building to comply with the May 1, 2015 Order.  This plan will address all aspects of the Order including accessibility.  This process is different in every situation, and can take varying amounts of time.  In this particular situation unfortunately, it had to be done in the context of litigation involving not only the Town and the owner, but two other parties.  This has also meant that public comment on the progression of the matter has necessarily been minimal.  

The Town of Wolfville and the owner of the building, Micro Boutique, wish to assure the citizens of Wolfville that the matter is not sitting dormant.  We hope to be able to release more details in the coming weeks.  In the meantime, we also wish to assure the citizens, and particularly the tenants of 336 Main Street, that neither party is aware of any safety concerns that would warrant an Order to Vacate”. 

Mayor Jeff Cantwell

St. Patrick’s Day and Cheaton Cup!

With St. Patrick’s Day and Cheaton Cup occurring this week, we are anticipating a lot of activity, on and off campus. 

Cheaton Cup is a 20 year old tradition between two rivalry residence at Acadia University. The Annual hockey game between Chipman House and Eaton House takes place Saturday, March 19 with all proceeds from the game going towards SMILE and L’Arche. 

The Town, Acadia, and the RCMP have been working together to ensure a safe event that will help support two local organizations. If there are any issues please contact the RCMP detachment at 902-542-3817.

Request for Proposals - Photocopiers

The Town of Wolfville invites interested parties to submit a proposal for the lease or purchase and maintenance of four (4) photocopiers and associated services at the following locations:a.

  1. Two (2) at Town Hall, 359 Main Street;
  2. One (1) at Public Works & Community Development, 200 Dykeland Street; and
  3. One (1) at Wolfville Library, 21 Elm Avenue;

Closing Date:  March 22, 2016 (4:30pm)

  RFP WOL006-2016 Link

  View Addendum (Issued March 14, 2016)

Eligibility Deadline for 2016 Municipal Election March 13

The 2016 Municipal Election will take place on Saturday, October 15, 2016. If you are interested in running in the election you must be an ordinarily resident of the Town of Wolfville by March 13, 2016.

The Municipal Elections Act defines an ordinarily resident as follows:

16 (1) A person is ordinarily resident in the place where the person lives and to which, whenever absent, the person intends to return.

(2) A person may be ordinarily resident in only one place at a time.

(3) A person does not cease to be ordinarily resident in a place by leaving the place for a temporary purpose only.

(4) Where a person usually sleeps in one place and has meals or is employed in another place, the person is ordinarily resident in the place where the person sleeps.

(5) Where a person has temporary residential quarters, those quarters are considered to be the place in which the person is ordinarily resident only if the person has no other place the person considers as that person's ordinary place of residence.

(6) Where a person is being provided with food, lodging or other social services by a shelter, hostel or similar institution, the person is ordinarily resident in the shelter, hostel or institution.

(7) Where the rules set out in subsections (1) to (6) are not sufficient to determine the place where a person is ordinarily resident, the place where the person is ordinarily resident must be determined by the appropriate election officer with reference to all the facts of the case.

(8) A person who, on the ordinary polling day,(a) is a student;(b) is ordinarily resident in a polling district or polling division other than that of the person's family home; and(c) is qualified as an elector,may elect to be included on the list of electors in one or the other of the polling divisions, but not both, and is deemed to be ordinarily resident in that polling division.

(9) A person is not ordinarily resident in a residence that is generally occupied by the person only between the beginning of May and the end of October but that is generally unoccupied between the beginning of November and the end of April unless the person does not have another residence in the Province where the person resides between the beginning of November and the end of April.

 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact the Town's Returning Officer, Jennifer Boyd at 902-542-2400 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

2016/17 Budget Process

The 2016/17 budget process formally started in the fall of 2015 at the November Committee of the Whole meeting; however, it should be noted input on budget matters takes place throughout the year.

Assessments

It is important to highlight that the increase in taxable assessments for 2016 are relatively small in the residential sector and that, in fact, commercial assessments have declined. With no change in tax rates, the 2016/17 taxable assessment base will only generate $64,900 in increased revenue. This compares to $243,000 increased revenue in 2015/16 budget, and $165,000 increased revenue in 2014/15. The reality is that the Town had less new assessment from construction, and a very small increase from cost of living increase applied to assessments via the Provincial Capped Assessment Program (CAP).

  • Provincial CAP for 2016 is 0.3%
  • 54% of residential properties qualified for CAP
  • 87% of residential assessments increased 1% of less, including properties that decreased
  • 5% of residential assessments declined
  • Commercial had an overall 2.4% drop in taxable assessment value
  • Approximately 60% of commercial accounts declined in value, which appears to be a trend across the province.

Draft Version 1

Draft Version 1 was presented to Council at a Special Committee of the Whole meeting on January 21, 2016 and had a short fall in excess of $300,000.

The following direction was provided to staff to prepare version 2:

Revenues

The following expenditures would be funded through the Town's Operating Reserve*  
  2016 Municipal Election   $25,000
  One year term position for building inspection (part-time)     38,600
  Term employee for Phase II of the MPS Review (part-time)     19,800
  Capital Funding Requirement     48,000
The estimated revenue for parking fines was increased     16,000
Employment grant for GIS summer student       8,200

Expenditures

Partial Implementation of Compensation Plan     $30,000
 Reduction in Professional Development Budget      20,000
 Remove allowance for additional staff hours in finance         9,600
Reduction in contract services for the CAO         3,000
Decrease in tax exemption expenditure for 2016 assessments                                       3,400
Reduction to Festival & Events Program expenditures      10,000
   
Total Reduction in Shortfall $241,600

*Staff recommended using operating reserves for these expenditures in accordance with the Town's Reserve Policy (140-006).

  Click here to view the January 21, 2016 Special Committee of the Whole Agenda Package.

 

Draft Version 2

Draft Version 2 was presnted to Council on February 2, 2016 at a regular Committee of the Whole meeting with a short fall of $88,200.  The following direction was provided to staff to prepare version 3:

Remove the Student Liaison Officer Position $18,100
Remove the marketing outreach associated with the Student Liaison     2,000
Remove additional marketing monies to maintain previous  year budget     5,000

Staff outlined the impact of Tax Rate Changes to Council leading Council to indicate support for a Tax Rate increase for 2016/17, but only after full review of the Operating Budget for other possible savings.

If 1 cent is added to the residential tax rate, it would have the following impact:

  • 87% of residential accounts will see a 1% or lower increase in tax dollars paid.
  • 262 of these accounts (16% overall) will still see a decrease in taxes at an average of $291 or $143, excluding the single largest decline.
  • Within the 87%, the accounts with an increase will see an average increase of $29 compared to what they paid in 2015/16.

  Click here to view the February 2, 2016 Committee of the Whole Agenda Package

 

Draft Version 3

Draft Version 3 was presented to Council on February 16, 2016 at a Special Committee of the Whole meeting as a balanced budget.

Changes made to reach a balanced budget are as follows:

Revenue

Add 1 cent to residential and commercial tax rates* $41,300
Adjust revenue for sale of service (Planning)    4,500
Remove grant related to GIS Summer Student  (8,200)
Reduce estimated festival/events revenue (12,000)
Remove Municipal Physical Activity Leadership Program grant revenue          (25,000)
Add conditional recovery of summer wine bus staff    7,700
Change in Revenue $ 8,200

*Staff included a 1 cent increase to the commercial rate in addition to a 1 cent increase to the residential.  A 1 cent increase to the commercial rate means that:

  • 61 accounts will still play less than they did in 2015/16
  • 4 accounts will have no change
  • 46 accounts will pay more; and
  • Overall, the commercial sector will pay less than they did in 2015/16

Expenditures

Reduction in Professtional Development, net change in salary/wages  $   1,800
Increase estimate of RCMP contract  (37,000)
Remove Student Liason Position and related expenses   20,100
Remove Alternative Justice initative     5,000
Reduce contracted service in solid waste     5,000
Remove GIS Summer Student   12,300
Net reduction in consolidation of two positions (merge Events & Recreation)    55,000
General reduction of marketing budget     5,000
Reduction in operating equipment and supplies in Festival/Events   10,000
Reduction onf Festival/Events program spending as a result of re-org.     6,500
Add seasonal/part-time wages for after school program position  (13,000)
Reduction in employee benefit estimate     1,000
Reduction in estimate for Valley Waste Resource Management    12,000
Increase estimate for Regional Housing Costs   (2,000)
Change in Expenditure $80,000

 

WBDC - Business Development Area Rate

Based on preliminary indications, the budget will include an amount of $39,500 to transfer to the WBDC.  This means:

  • 54% drop in required area rate revenue, or reduction of $45,500 from 2015/16
  • Area rates would drop approximately 14.5 cents in the downtown and 7 centres outside of the downtown (2015/16 rates were 31 cents and 14.5 cents respectively)
  • Average decrease over 111 commercial accounts is $410 per account

  Click here to view February 16, 2016 Special Committee of Whole Agenda Package

  Click here to view the February 16, 2016 Budget Presentation

The 2016/17 Operating, Capital and Water Utility Budgets and Operating Plan will be discussed again on March 1, 2016 at a regular Committee of the Whole meeting with the hopes of being approved at the regular March 22, 2016 Town Council meeting.  Check back for more updates!

March Break Adventure Camp

This year the Town of Wolfville and Acadia are partnering to deliver a March Break Adventure Camp for children from age 5-14 years. 

NEW! Adventure Camp

Come and explore with Acadia over March Break, with instructors who will show you how to design a town and a skate park as they explore Wolfville on a scavenger hunt. Experience snow shoeing, tennis, fencing and other arts and craft adventures. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.

Ages: 5-14

Time: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Date: March 14 - 18

Location: Acadia University

Cost: $150

Register Here!

If financial assistance is required, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.  We can help.

Thrive! Community Access Times

Thriveswim2016

Thrive Free Indoor track Poster

Winter Snowshoe Series

Snowshoe Series Poster 2015 page 002

To book your snowshoes follow this link and fill out the form!

Tender WOL017-2015- RCMP Detachment Renovations

The Town of Wolfville will be accepting tenders for renovation work to be carried out at the RCMP Detachment. Bidders must attend a mandatory site visit on January 12th, 2016 at 10:00am at 363 Main Street, Wolfville, NS.

Electronic Project Documents may be obtained from Karen Outerleys at the Town of Wolfville, by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sealed bids clearly marked “WOL017-2015 RCMP Detachment Renovations and addressed to the Town of Wolfville, NS, Attn: Kevin Kerr, Director of Public Works, will be received at the Town Office (359 Main Street) up to 2:00 p.m., local time, on Thursday, January 21st, 2016.

The Town of Wolfville reserves the right to reject any or all tenders, not necessarily accept the lowest tender, or to accept any tender which it may consider to be in its best interest.  The Town of Wolfville also reserves the right to waive formality, informality or technicality in any tender.

Nova Scotia Chorus Girl Turned War Hero

Nova Scotia chorus girl turned war hero paid steep price for helping hide Allied soldiers in WWII

View the remarkable story of a Nova Scotia woman who was willing to give up her own life to save Allied soldiers from the Nazis during World War II.

The National, November 11, 2015